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The Mushrooms are Blooming

09/24/2009

Lately there are numerous mushrooms in the yard and in the woods.   Today is sunny and cool and too gorgeous to be inside working…so I took a break and took the camera out to get some mushroom pictures.

I have tried to identify these by using my Field Guide to New England, but I am not an expert by any means so if I have named something incorrectly I’d appreciate the heads up.

My Field Guide

My Field Guide

According to the field guide, there are at least 10 deadly poisonous species of mushroom in New England. I sure didn’t know that. In fact I never knew the name of any mushrooms until today. Like my seashell collection, I like them… but never really cared what they were called.

Fly Amanita *Deadly Poisonous

Fly Amanita *Deadly Poisonous

This yellow/orange mushroom is the Fly Amanita and I think the little one (below) is a “baby” since it was growing in the same area as the others, but I am not sure.

Tiny Mushroom - "Fly Amanita"?

Tiny Mushroom - "Fly Amanita"?

The red one below is also poisonous, but doesn’t say “deadly poisonous” like the one pictured above.

Emetic Russula *Poisonous

Emetic Russula *Poisonous

You can read more about the Emetic Russula mushroom on the site link, but I find it interesting that the site doesn’t mention that this one is poisonous.

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. 09/25/2009 4:09 pm

    That red capped mushroom looks very interesting. You don’t seem many of those around these parts. I’ve been thinking about joining the Boston Mycological Club as they plan day trips to identify mushrooms. I’d love to learn more about the edible wild mushrooms we have here in New England, that is, if I can get over my fear of the poisonous ones!

    • 09/25/2009 10:09 pm

      I feel the same way. I love to eat mushrooms, but it sounds tricky to collect and eat them from the wild since there are so many different types. I’m going to get some more photos – I find myself noticing them now and want to know more!

  2. 09/29/2009 3:36 am

    I too make use of an Audubon field guide. Years ago when I homeschooled my sons we gathered as many types as possible in the woods just in our yard. I think we had well over a dozen varieties. I’ve never eaten any but have always felt that maybe I’m missing out on something really good.

    I’ve noticed the red type here too but it certainly isn’t one that’s common. Your photo of the baby one in the moss is lovely. They certainly make the fall landscape more magical.

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